It is not always the case that parents will need to establish a child support plan in conjunction with a divorce. In some cases, Ohio parents may be unmarried, and thus not need to legally divorce or even divide property.

Moreover, they may agree to raise their child as co-parents in separate homes, thus alleviating the need for a custody and parenting time hearing.

When child support is the only issue on the table, then parents may wish to negotiate the terms of their agreements outside of court, since child support can be a relatively easy item to negotiate.

They may draft and file with the court agreements that establish the specific provisions of what is expected of them with regard to their child support obligations, such as when the payments will be due and how much support will be provided by the paying parent. They may also operate under informal agreements, but when one parent fails to abide by the agreement’s terms the other parent may run into problems with enforcement.

Even if parents wish to set up their own child support agreements it can be a good idea for them to submit them to the courts to be given the weight of judicial approval. An agreement that is signed off by the courts carries with it the authority of the court to be followed and specific enforcement procedures that may be implemented if compliance is lacking.

An attorney can help their client draft and execute a strong child support agreement. Utilizing the help of a family law legal professional can help a parent avoid costly mistakes and support their children as they secure financial assistance for their futures.